Reverb

#WWCtree Tattoo Contenst

This year the Class of 2014’s senior gift is also a contest! MaggieMae Farthing and I worked with the College Press to print some temporary #WWCtree tattoos  that can be bought for only three bucks! Once you buy and apply one of these  guys, post your photos to facebook, instagram, and twitter with the hashtag #WWCtree in order to enter the contest—yes, there’s a prize! These babies are  coming out the week before spring break in hopes that you guys will take them on
your road trips and post some crazy, exotic photos of where you’re visiting this  break. We’ll pick a winner based on overall creativity, i.e. not just based on a  pretty landscape, so no matter where you are try to find unique, weird and different ways to pose with your #WWCtree tattoo.

Not only will these  tattoos make you look fly, but the money we raise will go towards the senior gift to the WWC Fund, which supports 80% of students thorough scholarships! Warren Wilson College has given us so much during our time here, and this is a  really fun and easy way for us to give back! This is by far the coolest senior gift yet, so make sure you buy your #WWCtree tattoo at the bookstore or during lunch and participate in this easy way to give back to your school.

- Written by Matthew Grier


Call for Submissions: Where Were You On 9/11?

Hello People! Long time no see!


Well its a new school year and as such Reverb will soon be full of photos, videos, creative words and other cool things but first of all we wanted to ask for your help.


Our new Echo issue will be coming out on Wednesday September 11th and since this is such an important date in history we are asking for submissions that answer the question, where were you on 9/11? These can be photos, stories or just short responses. You can e-mail whatever you’d like to our main echo e-mail address at wwcecho@gmail.com with your submission.


We will be selecting a few of these submissions to include in our print issue of the Echo when its released on the 11th. We look forward to receiving your submission.


Big Gigantic at the Orange Peel
By Claire Toal 


“The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to talk, mad to be saved, delirious of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue center light pop and everyone goes “Awww!” -Jack Kerouac
 
            This past Saturday, 2/6, I abandoned any sense of unfamiliarity or naivety to the electronic drum and base music scene when I attended Big Gigantic at the Orange Peel.  Big Gigantic is a vibrant, unique highly spirited duo composed of Dominic Lalli (saxophone and producer) Jeremy Salken (drums). 
            Big Gigantic is from Boulder, Colorado, which is often compared to Asheville, and characterized by instrumental live-tronica, hip-hop, and jazzy notes.  Energized electronic beats, live saxophone and drums instrumentation form an intimate coalescence with intense light shows consisting of bright, rhythmic lights with visuals to create a submission to the euphoric atmosphere.  
            The show was a mesmerizing experience. Through the myriads of shimmering costumes, along with disjointed dance moves, obvious hunger madness” pulsed through the eyes of the members in the crowd.  Playful electronic beats, base drops, the synthesizers residual shock, and with neon penetrated eyelids the atmosphere of the venue.  The perspiration perfumed dance floor boasted males and females alike—primarily bros desperate to display their own renditions of rhythms the beat had internally inspired.  The crowd gazed greedily in every direction frantic to capture/comprehend the energy that was manifesting itself into its geometric, fluid, and physical expression.  
            Bright hues from the light show fused with electric saxophone beats transforming the audience into a surprise explosion of bliss.  
            Big Gigantic’s audible performance yielded complete adoration from its audience while everyone including my friends, and I basked in the kaleidoscopic audible sounds created by Big Gigantic. View Larger

Big Gigantic at the Orange Peel

By Claire Toal

“The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to talk, mad to be saved, delirious of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue center light pop and everyone goes “Awww!” -Jack Kerouac

 

            This past Saturday, 2/6, I abandoned any sense of unfamiliarity or naivety to the electronic drum and base music scene when I attended Big Gigantic at the Orange Peel.  Big Gigantic is a vibrant, unique highly spirited duo composed of Dominic Lalli (saxophone and producer) Jeremy Salken (drums).

            Big Gigantic is from Boulder, Colorado, which is often compared to Asheville, and characterized by instrumental live-tronica, hip-hop, and jazzy notes.  Energized electronic beats, live saxophone and drums instrumentation form an intimate coalescence with intense light shows consisting of bright, rhythmic lights with visuals to create a submission to the euphoric atmosphere. 

            The show was a mesmerizing experience. Through the myriads of shimmering costumes, along with disjointed dance moves, obvious hunger madness” pulsed through the eyes of the members in the crowd.  Playful electronic beats, base drops, the synthesizers residual shock, and with neon penetrated eyelids the atmosphere of the venue.  The perspiration perfumed dance floor boasted males and females alike—primarily bros desperate to display their own renditions of rhythms the beat had internally inspired.  The crowd gazed greedily in every direction frantic to capture/comprehend the energy that was manifesting itself into its geometric, fluid, and physical expression. 

            Bright hues from the light show fused with electric saxophone beats transforming the audience into a surprise explosion of bliss. 

            Big Gigantic’s audible performance yielded complete adoration from its audience while everyone including my friends, and I basked in the kaleidoscopic audible sounds created by Big Gigantic.


Seeking Break Workers and People with Cool Tattoos for New Speech Patterns

It’s the beginning of a new semester here at Wilson and as always the Echo staff is on the look out for new stories. Reverb is joining in the fun by creating a new speech pattern series and reviving an old one. First of all we are looking for student break workers (whether they be summer, winter, spring or thanksgiving) with interesting stories about life on campus when you’re working vs living the triad. 
So if you have a funny, interesting or just weird story you’d like to share about your experience as a break worker on campus please message us and we will get back to you asap about setting up a speech pattern interview.
The speech pattern series we are reviving is the Tattoo series. The tattoo series was started a year ago by our editor, Grace Hatton, who is fascinated by interesting looking tattoos but even more interested by the stories behind them. We post a photo of the tattoo along with a fun quick audio clip that describes the story behind the tattoo. If you have a kick ass tattoo that you love or hate that also happens to have an interesting story behind it, we’d love to talk about it with you. Again if you’re interested in doing a quick, less than ten minutes, speech pattern for Reverb just shoot us a quick message. 
Thank you in advance for helping to make Reverb awesome by participating in a speech pattern series and in turn helping us to celebrate all the amazing individuals that call Warren Wilson home. 

P.S - FYI being interviewed for a Reverb speech pattern makes you a feel at least a little famous so that’s something to look forward too. 
P.P.S - Unfortunately the Echo office does not have a bedazzled microphone (like the one in the photo) to use for recording speech patterns, but it’d be pretty great if we did. 

Seeking Break Workers and People with Cool Tattoos for New Speech Patterns

It’s the beginning of a new semester here at Wilson and as always the Echo staff is on the look out for new stories. Reverb is joining in the fun by creating a new speech pattern series and reviving an old one. First of all we are looking for student break workers (whether they be summer, winter, spring or thanksgiving) with interesting stories about life on campus when you’re working vs living the triad.

So if you have a funny, interesting or just weird story you’d like to share about your experience as a break worker on campus please message us and we will get back to you asap about setting up a speech pattern interview.

The speech pattern series we are reviving is the Tattoo series. The tattoo series was started a year ago by our editor, Grace Hatton, who is fascinated by interesting looking tattoos but even more interested by the stories behind them. We post a photo of the tattoo along with a fun quick audio clip that describes the story behind the tattoo. If you have a kick ass tattoo that you love or hate that also happens to have an interesting story behind it, we’d love to talk about it with you. Again if you’re interested in doing a quick, less than ten minutes, speech pattern for Reverb just shoot us a quick message.

Thank you in advance for helping to make Reverb awesome by participating in a speech pattern series and in turn helping us to celebrate all the amazing individuals that call Warren Wilson home.

P.S - FYI being interviewed for a Reverb speech pattern makes you a feel at least a little famous so that’s something to look forward too.


P.P.S - Unfortunately the Echo office does not have a bedazzled microphone (like the one in the photo) to use for recording speech patterns, but it’d be pretty great if we did. 


Marc Williams leads Wild Ferment-Nation Workshop    
By Jake Fraser
“Animals are something invented by plants to move seeds around.”-Terence Mckenna.2007 Warren Wilson alumnus Marc Williams recently led a group of knowledge hungry students on a first-hand guided journey that involved five exciting hours of discovering the often overlooked edible weeds that blanket our campus, followed by a crash course on glorious fermented foods, and concluded with a variety of delicious, peculiar, and nutritious fermented eats and drinks.This strangely hot day in December set a carefree summer-fun spooky global warming stinky person, kind of tone: right up Warren Wilson alley. We started the workshop with a stroll through campus identifying numerous edible plants along the way. From sassafras to creasy greens, our bio-diverse region houses a multitude of edible and medicinal plants. Our walk outlined some basic plant classification, field identification, culinary applications, and health benefits of plants we found along the way, some plants found include: Burdock, yellow dock, Ale hoof, sassafras, chickweed, nettles, wild onions, mint, wild carrots and their parsley-like greens, dandelion, fennel, yarrow, absinthe and mugwort.    After the information packed walk through campus, we gathered on the couches of lower fellowship, for an hour lecture on the products, history, and benefits of fermentation. All over the world, for thousands of years fermentation has been used to preserve foods like Sauerkraut, Kimchee, vinegar, yogurt, kefir, cheese, sourdough breads,pickles, soy sauce, coffee, tea, liquor, wine, mead,beer, and cider. These foods are rich in probiotics—which help improve digestion and general immune system warding off disease. Enzymes that breakdown complex proteins into simpler amino acids and B vitamins are also created through fermentation. Plus, the lactose in milk is converted to lactic acid. Besides the health benefits, fermented foods add variety in flavor and texture.
    We ended the day learning how to make some fermented foods including Sauerkraut, yogurt, kefir, hummus, dosas, and kombucha. After an informative hands-on cooking session we gathered around to try our dishes as well as the diverse selection of fermented products Williams brought to share. To name a few, we made an arugula and fennel yogurt dip, hummus, and dosas, using some of the wild plants we picked earlier, and tried almost ten different kombuchas, water and milk kefir, jun, beet kvass, yogurt, sauerkraut and ginger brew of William’s. The group left the five hour workshop smiling with stomachs full and eyebrows raised.“If I can make it, why not?” said Marc Williams.Marc Williams has studied plants intensively for food, medicine, and beauty. His training includes; a bachelor’s degree concentrating in Sustainable Agriculture from Warren Wilson College, over a decade working at a multitude of restaurants, various farms, and the pursuit of botanical exploration throughout North/Central America and Western Europe. He is currently studying to get a master’s degree concentrating in Sustainable Development from Appalachian State University. (botanyeverday.com)“If you come to one of my workshops, you’re gonna learn something.” said Williams.Some handy highlights from the work shop:
 Fresh Mint     Tea

Mint,      the biggest spice family provides basil, thyme, oregano, Marjoram,     and of course mints. Warren Wilson’s usual suspects: Spearmint,     winter mint, mountain mint, bee balm, Heal all and lemon balm, all     easily recognized by their square stems and symmetrically opposing     leaves and can be mixed into water on the way to class to make a     delicious bourgeois drink.     

There are tons of wild green onions on campus, that can be safely identified by their distinct onion smell; Onions make a lot of food taste better.

Dorm-made     Yogurt
 Heat     up a half a gallon milk to at least 115 degrees F, add two spoonfuls     of store bought yogurt, and wrap it up in a sleeping bag or cuddle     with it for eight hours and BAM. To make Greek yogurt: place any yogurt in a strainer or colander, atop of a bowl in the fridge, until enough liquid has drained and a desired consistency is reached.

Sauerkraut/ Kimchee: Just combine three tablespoons of salt with about five     pounds of sliced vegetables, pressed tightly in a glass or ceramic     container. Make sure water rises above the vegetables within a     couple days, or add a cup of water and a tablespoon of salt. Let sit     for 10 days.
View Larger

Marc Williams leads Wild Ferment-Nation Workshop   

By Jake Fraser

“Animals are something invented by plants to move seeds around.”-Terence Mckenna.

2007 Warren Wilson alumnus Marc Williams recently led a group of knowledge hungry students on a first-hand guided journey that involved five exciting hours of discovering the often overlooked edible weeds that blanket our campus, followed by a crash course on glorious fermented foods, and concluded with a variety of delicious, peculiar, and nutritious fermented eats and drinks.

This strangely hot day in December set a carefree summer-fun spooky global warming stinky person, kind of tone: right up Warren Wilson alley. We started the workshop with a stroll through campus identifying numerous edible plants along the way. From sassafras to creasy greens, our bio-diverse region houses a multitude of edible and medicinal plants. Our walk outlined some basic plant classification, field identification, culinary applications, and health benefits of plants we found along the way, some plants found include: Burdock, yellow dock, Ale hoof, sassafras, chickweed, nettles, wild onions, mint, wild carrots and their parsley-like greens, dandelion, fennel, yarrow, absinthe and mugwort.

    After the information packed walk through campus, we gathered on the couches of lower fellowship, for an hour lecture on the products, history, and benefits of fermentation. All over the world, for thousands of years fermentation has been used to preserve foods like Sauerkraut, Kimchee, vinegar, yogurt, kefir, cheese, sourdough breads,pickles, soy sauce, coffee, tea, liquor, wine, mead,beer, and cider. These foods are rich in probiotics—which help improve digestion and general immune system warding off disease. Enzymes that breakdown complex proteins into simpler amino acids and B vitamins are also created through fermentation. Plus, the lactose in milk is converted to lactic acid. Besides the health benefits, fermented foods add variety in flavor and texture.


    We ended the day learning how to make some fermented foods including Sauerkraut, yogurt, kefir, hummus, dosas, and kombucha. After an informative hands-on cooking session we gathered around to try our dishes as well as the diverse selection of fermented products Williams brought to share. To name a few, we made an arugula and fennel yogurt dip, hummus, and dosas, using some of the wild plants we picked earlier, and tried almost ten different kombuchas, water and milk kefir, jun, beet kvass, yogurt, sauerkraut and ginger brew of William’s. The group left the five hour workshop smiling with stomachs full and eyebrows raised.

“If I can make it, why not?” said Marc Williams.

Marc Williams has studied plants intensively for food, medicine, and beauty. His training includes; a bachelor’s degree concentrating in Sustainable Agriculture from Warren Wilson College, over a decade working at a multitude of restaurants, various farms, and the pursuit of botanical exploration throughout North/Central America and Western Europe. He is currently studying to get a master’s degree concentrating in Sustainable Development from Appalachian State University. (botanyeverday.com)

“If you come to one of my workshops, you’re gonna learn something.” said Williams.


Some handy highlights from the work shop:

Fresh Mint     Tea

    • Mint,      the biggest spice family provides basil, thyme, oregano, Marjoram,     and of course mints. Warren Wilson’s usual suspects: Spearmint,     winter mint, mountain mint, bee balm, Heal all and lemon balm, all     easily recognized by their square stems and symmetrically opposing     leaves and can be mixed into water on the way to class to make a     delicious bourgeois drink.    

    • There are tons of wild green onions on campus, that can be safely identified by their distinct onion smell; Onions make a lot of food taste better.

    • Dorm-made     Yogurt

Heat     up a half a gallon milk to at least 115 degrees F, add two spoonfuls     of store bought yogurt, and wrap it up in a sleeping bag or cuddle     with it for eight hours and BAM. To make Greek yogurt: place any yogurt in a strainer or colander, atop of a bowl in the fridge, until enough liquid has drained and a desired consistency is reached.

    • Sauerkraut/ Kimchee: Just combine three tablespoons of salt with about five     pounds of sliced vegetables, pressed tightly in a glass or ceramic     container. Make sure water rises above the vegetables within a     couple days, or add a cup of water and a tablespoon of salt. Let sit     for 10 days.



Unique Noise at the Orange Peel
By Claire Toal

I remember the first time I heard “Sleigh Bells”. Statistics, guacamole, Winston cigarettes, and a telemarketing job consumed that summer. Gale, my closest girlfriend at that time, took up residence in one of the extra bedrooms in my parent’s suburban home and spent her days searching for additional part time summer employment. On a hazy Thursday afternoon, she picked me up from my community college and bombarded me with the noise pop of “Sleigh Bells”. I could barely decipher the lyrics, but Gale seemed ecstatic about her new musical discovery. Although we listened to it frequently that summer it was not something that would be found in the “Recently Played” portion of my iPod.
While visiting downtown Asheville, I came across an Orange Peel poster that listed Sleigh Bells as being the featured artist on Tuesday, 10/9. I had never been to a show at the Orange Peel (primarily because I am not especially familiar with many of the artists who play at the venue) and thought that attending Sleigh Bells would be an enjoyable, worthwhile experience. It also presented itself as a great opportunity to write a story for reverb.
Sleigh Bells, established themselves as a “noise-pop, indie pop/rock, dance funk” duo, in 2008 in Brooklyn NYC. The duo consists of Derek Edward Miller (guitar) and Alexis Krauss (vocals). Miller, a former guitarist for Poison the Well, moved to Brooklyn looking for a female vocalist to collaborate with on his song demos. While working at a Brazilian Bistro in Brooklyn he met Krauss, who at the time was teaching Spanish to children in the Bronx. Miller expressed his desire to find a female vocalist, while Krauss was dining with her mother at the restaurant. After being volunteered by her mother, she met with Miller and reviewed his demos in a park, through his headphones. Krauss had been pursuing a Rhodes scholarship at the time, yet chose to begin a creative relationship with Miller instead. Sleigh Bells signed to M.I.A’s N.E.E.T Recordings, and Mom+Pop records in 2009, and soon after recorded their first seven track self-titled EP. Their first album, Treats, was released in May 2010.
Sleigh Bells released Reign Of Terror in February 2012, which also serves as the title of their current tour. I am partial to their first album, which features tracks such as “Tell ‘Em,” “Rill Rill,” and “Crown on the Ground.”
I definitely underestimated the intensity of the show. Krauss’ vocals are very unique, and Sleigh Bells produces an awesome, mind-boggling noise. The duo did not come on stage until a little after 11, yet definitely made their presence at the Orange Peel known. A little before the show started I remember glancing at a sign that advertised ear plugs for 50 cents, and thinking to myself that I might want to invest. I really should have. The sign accompanied with a case of ringing ears haunted me for days.
Although the concert was not exactly soothing to the senses, I found Sleigh Bells to be a great way to be introduced to the Orange Peel. The concert was a great experience with Krauss dawning a sick leather jacket that was a stunning contrast to the fog, and colorful lighting and the music was in a word, unfathomable. View Larger

Unique Noise at the Orange Peel


By Claire Toal


I remember the first time I heard “Sleigh Bells”. Statistics, guacamole, Winston cigarettes, and a telemarketing job consumed that summer. Gale, my closest girlfriend at that time, took up residence in one of the extra bedrooms in my parent’s suburban home and spent her days searching for additional part time summer employment. On a hazy Thursday afternoon, she picked me up from my community college and bombarded me with the noise pop of “Sleigh Bells”. I could barely decipher the lyrics, but Gale seemed ecstatic about her new musical discovery. Although we listened to it frequently that summer it was not something that would be found in the “Recently Played” portion of my iPod.

While visiting downtown Asheville, I came across an Orange Peel poster that listed Sleigh Bells as being the featured artist on Tuesday, 10/9. I had never been to a show at the Orange Peel (primarily because I am not especially familiar with many of the artists who play at the venue) and thought that attending Sleigh Bells would be an enjoyable, worthwhile experience. It also presented itself as a great opportunity to write a story for reverb.

Sleigh Bells, established themselves as a “noise-pop, indie pop/rock, dance funk” duo, in 2008 in Brooklyn NYC. The duo consists of Derek Edward Miller (guitar) and Alexis Krauss (vocals). Miller, a former guitarist for Poison the Well, moved to Brooklyn looking for a female vocalist to collaborate with on his song demos. While working at a Brazilian Bistro in Brooklyn he met Krauss, who at the time was teaching Spanish to children in the Bronx. Miller expressed his desire to find a female vocalist, while Krauss was dining with her mother at the restaurant. After being volunteered by her mother, she met with Miller and reviewed his demos in a park, through his headphones. Krauss had been pursuing a Rhodes scholarship at the time, yet chose to begin a creative relationship with Miller instead. Sleigh Bells signed to M.I.A’s N.E.E.T Recordings, and Mom+Pop records in 2009, and soon after recorded their first seven track self-titled EP. Their first album, Treats, was released in May 2010.

Sleigh Bells released Reign Of Terror in February 2012, which also serves as the title of their current tour. I am partial to their first album, which features tracks such as “Tell ‘Em,” “Rill Rill,” and “Crown on the Ground.”

I definitely underestimated the intensity of the show. Krauss’ vocals are very unique, and Sleigh Bells produces an awesome, mind-boggling noise. The duo did not come on stage until a little after 11, yet definitely made their presence at the Orange Peel known. A little before the show started I remember glancing at a sign that advertised ear plugs for 50 cents, and thinking to myself that I might want to invest. I really should have. The sign accompanied with a case of ringing ears haunted me for days.

Although the concert was not exactly soothing to the senses, I found Sleigh Bells to be a great way to be introduced to the Orange Peel. The concert was a great experience with Krauss dawning a sick leather jacket that was a stunning contrast to the fog, and colorful lighting and the music was in a word, unfathomable.


Call for Submissions: Hurricane Sandy

Have your family or friends been affected by Hurricane Sandy? Do you have a poem, story or photo you’d be willing to share?

Since many Wilson students are from up north we are asking for submissions about Sandy and how its affecting your home region. To submit something simply shoot us an e-mail at echo@warren-wilson.edu and make sure to put Reverb submission: Hurricane Sandy in the title.

Feel free to submit photos, creative non fiction, poems or experiences. Also please be sure to provide your preferred name in your e-mail so if we use your work we can give proper credit.

Thanks for submissions in advance!


Rage, Rest and Repeat
Zazie Tobey 
On September 8th 2012 UM performed a show in Black Mountain at the local Pisgah Brewing Company. Most commonly referred to as a progressive-improvisational rock jam band, UM’s unique compositions have been evolving for over a decade of sound since the band formed back in their early college days.
 Pisgah is easily my favorite venue in the Asheville/Black Mountain Area. Beer stands, VIP sections and Port-o pots lined the edges of Pisgah’s outdoor venue, setting the scene for the debaucherous evening to come. The covered stage is wide and quite impressive in height; eliminate the quandary of where to stand. You can be situated anywhere at Pisgah and still see the whole show; the action and the good people are everywhere. 
 
During the show my eyes became moths, dive-bombing the hypnotizing light. I could feel my own face melting; surrendering to the neon lights and patterned projections encircling the stage in a psychedelic halo. The colors summoned six musicians to the stage, filling the space like the flawless rainbow arching overhead.
 
Necks were cranked towards the sky, catching the remainder of the rainbow as dusk faded into night and night faded back to day, the stage lights rising over the crowd reminding us it was time to live by Umphrey’s 2012 tour mantra: “Rage, Rest, Repeat.”
 
Setting the stage for UM were Snarky Puppy, an instrumental fusion band based out of Denton Texas . Since the bands formation in 2004, Snarky Puppy has gone from the underground scene to an internationally acclaimed name in instrumental music. Referring to themselves as “somewhere between a garage band and a collective” the band has around 25 members in constant rotation. Members have played with musicians such as Snoop Dog, YoYoMa and Justin Timberlake, to name a few.
 
Snarky Puppy annihilated the audience with a display that looked more like a block party than a stage set. The percussion heavy, funk sounds of Snarky Puppy were far more than an opening band; they proved to be a raging party all of their own. The last song came to a satisfying breakdown of a suspended crescendo as hoots and whistles exploded out of a smoky sweat packed crowd.
 
For fifteen sweat drying minutes we shivered and awaited the main event of the evening. Everyone was in UM festival mode, as if shakedown street had paved its way right to the stage. A panorama filled the grass lot; deadheads, festie kids and travelers, hoola hoopers and that one old man you see at every jam band show standing in the same spot, unable to move for the entirety. Even when UM took their spots and the crowd couldn’t stand but to jump, he stood still, pupils like saucers absorbing the light.
 
The set exploded with “There’s no Crying in Mexico”, a heavy percussion, trance-beat that ran into the crescendo rich, electric-guitar track, “Get in the Van”. The crowd wiggled in a cosmic bliss, losing themselves in the mellow womp-womps that turned suddenly to an upbeat psychedelic dance jive in fourth song, “Nothing Too Fancy”.
Bodies angulated, limbs knocking, sweat dripping. Amidst the confusion I ran into, literally due to the massive turnout, the familiar face of Nathan Allen. Allen’s a sophomore at Wilson who has seen UM live eleven times. When I asked Allen to describe his opinion after the show his face brightened, the response immediate. “Bonkers, absurd, I lost my face”.
 
UM formed at Notre Dame in 1997 and has been gaining popularity ever since. The band consists of: Brendan Bayliss on Guitar & Vocals, Jake Cinninger on Guitar & Vocals, Joel Cummins on Keyboards & Vocals, Andy Farag on Percussion, Kris Myers on Drums & Vocals and Ryan Stasik on Bass. They are now one of the most internationally respected and highly demanded improvisational jam bands. Playing around one hundred shows a year together, the band members have saturated a shared musical consciousness but recognized quickly that “music is secondary to our relationships,” as Brendan Bayliss, the guitar and lead vocals, said in an interview on the UM website.
 
UM stands strong as accomplished musical alchemists, transforming covers of songs with their group wisdom and unfailing intuition. Individually, the musicians are extremely gifted and when the improvisational paths meet, a cohesive garden of sound blasts from the stage. The sound, the venue, the psychedelic lights and people it was all so unique- like the energy UM put into each song.
 
Silhouettes of swinging dreadlocks and bobbing heads got down to “Lets Dance” by David Bowie, a surprise that UM pulled out midway through their second set. Insane joy set in when the universal language of Bowie was twisted into a whole new definition of dance party. UM is notorious for putting their spin on classic covers. Ambient sounds moaned from Joel Cummings stylings on the keyboard, and the distant sound of an instrument that could have been the offspring of a cowbell and a triangle emerged from the percussion section. Electric guitar riffs and driving percussion rocked the audience, delivering constant danceable beats.
 
“Prowler” closed out the show’s encore as well as “1384”, a killer repeat from the start of the second set. “Prowler” crawled beneath my skin, haunting me out of Pisgah’s venue, towards the back of Pisgah’s indoor bar to catch an after show by the band Tiny Boxes. “Prowler’s” melody clung onto me through the after show, returning to me as my friends funneled out of the venue hightailing it to yet another show in downtown Asheville. But those are whole stories in and of themselves. What made my night was UM lighting it up, building it to the highest, and not daring to tear it down.
 If you missed it check out Umphrey’s McGee Live Recording Archive online to download the live show!

Rage, Rest and Repeat

Zazie Tobey

On September 8th 2012 UM performed a show in Black Mountain at the local Pisgah Brewing Company. Most commonly referred to as a progressive-improvisational rock jam band, UM’s unique compositions have been evolving for over a decade of sound since the band formed back in their early college days.

 Pisgah is easily my favorite venue in the Asheville/Black Mountain Area. Beer stands, VIP sections and Port-o pots lined the edges of Pisgah’s outdoor venue, setting the scene for the debaucherous evening to come. The covered stage is wide and quite impressive in height; eliminate the quandary of where to stand. You can be situated anywhere at Pisgah and still see the whole show; the action and the good people are everywhere.

 

During the show my eyes became moths, dive-bombing the hypnotizing light. I could feel my own face melting; surrendering to the neon lights and patterned projections encircling the stage in a psychedelic halo. The colors summoned six musicians to the stage, filling the space like the flawless rainbow arching overhead.

 

Necks were cranked towards the sky, catching the remainder of the rainbow as dusk faded into night and night faded back to day, the stage lights rising over the crowd reminding us it was time to live by Umphrey’s 2012 tour mantra: “Rage, Rest, Repeat.”

 

Setting the stage for UM were Snarky Puppy, an instrumental fusion band based out of Denton Texas . Since the bands formation in 2004, Snarky Puppy has gone from the underground scene to an internationally acclaimed name in instrumental music. Referring to themselves as “somewhere between a garage band and a collective” the band has around 25 members in constant rotation. Members have played with musicians such as Snoop Dog, YoYoMa and Justin Timberlake, to name a few.

 

Snarky Puppy annihilated the audience with a display that looked more like a block party than a stage set. The percussion heavy, funk sounds of Snarky Puppy were far more than an opening band; they proved to be a raging party all of their own. The last song came to a satisfying breakdown of a suspended crescendo as hoots and whistles exploded out of a smoky sweat packed crowd.

 

For fifteen sweat drying minutes we shivered and awaited the main event of the evening. Everyone was in UM festival mode, as if shakedown street had paved its way right to the stage. A panorama filled the grass lot; deadheads, festie kids and travelers, hoola hoopers and that one old man you see at every jam band show standing in the same spot, unable to move for the entirety. Even when UM took their spots and the crowd couldn’t stand but to jump, he stood still, pupils like saucers absorbing the light.

 

The set exploded with “There’s no Crying in Mexico”, a heavy percussion, trance-beat that ran into the crescendo rich, electric-guitar track, “Get in the Van”. The crowd wiggled in a cosmic bliss, losing themselves in the mellow womp-womps that turned suddenly to an upbeat psychedelic dance jive in fourth song, “Nothing Too Fancy”.

Bodies angulated, limbs knocking, sweat dripping. Amidst the confusion I ran into, literally due to the massive turnout, the familiar face of Nathan Allen. Allen’s a sophomore at Wilson who has seen UM live eleven times. When I asked Allen to describe his opinion after the show his face brightened, the response immediate. “Bonkers, absurd, I lost my face”.

 

UM formed at Notre Dame in 1997 and has been gaining popularity ever since. The band consists of: Brendan Bayliss on Guitar & Vocals, Jake Cinninger on Guitar & Vocals, Joel Cummins on Keyboards & Vocals, Andy Farag on Percussion, Kris Myers on Drums & Vocals and Ryan Stasik on Bass. They are now one of the most internationally respected and highly demanded improvisational jam bands. Playing around one hundred shows a year together, the band members have saturated a shared musical consciousness but recognized quickly that “music is secondary to our relationships,” as Brendan Bayliss, the guitar and lead vocals, said in an interview on the UM website.

 

UM stands strong as accomplished musical alchemists, transforming covers of songs with their group wisdom and unfailing intuition. Individually, the musicians are extremely gifted and when the improvisational paths meet, a cohesive garden of sound blasts from the stage. The sound, the venue, the psychedelic lights and people it was all so unique- like the energy UM put into each song.

 

Silhouettes of swinging dreadlocks and bobbing heads got down to “Lets Dance” by David Bowie, a surprise that UM pulled out midway through their second set. Insane joy set in when the universal language of Bowie was twisted into a whole new definition of dance party. UM is notorious for putting their spin on classic covers. Ambient sounds moaned from Joel Cummings stylings on the keyboard, and the distant sound of an instrument that could have been the offspring of a cowbell and a triangle emerged from the percussion section. Electric guitar riffs and driving percussion rocked the audience, delivering constant danceable beats.

 

“Prowler” closed out the show’s encore as well as “1384”, a killer repeat from the start of the second set. “Prowler” crawled beneath my skin, haunting me out of Pisgah’s venue, towards the back of Pisgah’s indoor bar to catch an after show by the band Tiny Boxes. “Prowler’s” melody clung onto me through the after show, returning to me as my friends funneled out of the venue hightailing it to yet another show in downtown Asheville. But those are whole stories in and of themselves. What made my night was UM lighting it up, building it to the highest, and not daring to tear it down.


If you missed it check out Umphrey’s McGee Live Recording Archive online to download the live show!