Reverb

Big Gigantic at the Orange Peel
By Claire Toal 


“The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to talk, mad to be saved, delirious of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue center light pop and everyone goes “Awww!” -Jack Kerouac
 
            This past Saturday, 2/6, I abandoned any sense of unfamiliarity or naivety to the electronic drum and base music scene when I attended Big Gigantic at the Orange Peel.  Big Gigantic is a vibrant, unique highly spirited duo composed of Dominic Lalli (saxophone and producer) Jeremy Salken (drums). 
            Big Gigantic is from Boulder, Colorado, which is often compared to Asheville, and characterized by instrumental live-tronica, hip-hop, and jazzy notes.  Energized electronic beats, live saxophone and drums instrumentation form an intimate coalescence with intense light shows consisting of bright, rhythmic lights with visuals to create a submission to the euphoric atmosphere.  
            The show was a mesmerizing experience. Through the myriads of shimmering costumes, along with disjointed dance moves, obvious hunger madness” pulsed through the eyes of the members in the crowd.  Playful electronic beats, base drops, the synthesizers residual shock, and with neon penetrated eyelids the atmosphere of the venue.  The perspiration perfumed dance floor boasted males and females alike—primarily bros desperate to display their own renditions of rhythms the beat had internally inspired.  The crowd gazed greedily in every direction frantic to capture/comprehend the energy that was manifesting itself into its geometric, fluid, and physical expression.  
            Bright hues from the light show fused with electric saxophone beats transforming the audience into a surprise explosion of bliss.  
            Big Gigantic’s audible performance yielded complete adoration from its audience while everyone including my friends, and I basked in the kaleidoscopic audible sounds created by Big Gigantic. View Larger

Big Gigantic at the Orange Peel

By Claire Toal

“The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to talk, mad to be saved, delirious of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue center light pop and everyone goes “Awww!” -Jack Kerouac

 

            This past Saturday, 2/6, I abandoned any sense of unfamiliarity or naivety to the electronic drum and base music scene when I attended Big Gigantic at the Orange Peel.  Big Gigantic is a vibrant, unique highly spirited duo composed of Dominic Lalli (saxophone and producer) Jeremy Salken (drums).

            Big Gigantic is from Boulder, Colorado, which is often compared to Asheville, and characterized by instrumental live-tronica, hip-hop, and jazzy notes.  Energized electronic beats, live saxophone and drums instrumentation form an intimate coalescence with intense light shows consisting of bright, rhythmic lights with visuals to create a submission to the euphoric atmosphere. 

            The show was a mesmerizing experience. Through the myriads of shimmering costumes, along with disjointed dance moves, obvious hunger madness” pulsed through the eyes of the members in the crowd.  Playful electronic beats, base drops, the synthesizers residual shock, and with neon penetrated eyelids the atmosphere of the venue.  The perspiration perfumed dance floor boasted males and females alike—primarily bros desperate to display their own renditions of rhythms the beat had internally inspired.  The crowd gazed greedily in every direction frantic to capture/comprehend the energy that was manifesting itself into its geometric, fluid, and physical expression. 

            Bright hues from the light show fused with electric saxophone beats transforming the audience into a surprise explosion of bliss. 

            Big Gigantic’s audible performance yielded complete adoration from its audience while everyone including my friends, and I basked in the kaleidoscopic audible sounds created by Big Gigantic.


Unique Noise at the Orange Peel
By Claire Toal

I remember the first time I heard “Sleigh Bells”. Statistics, guacamole, Winston cigarettes, and a telemarketing job consumed that summer. Gale, my closest girlfriend at that time, took up residence in one of the extra bedrooms in my parent’s suburban home and spent her days searching for additional part time summer employment. On a hazy Thursday afternoon, she picked me up from my community college and bombarded me with the noise pop of “Sleigh Bells”. I could barely decipher the lyrics, but Gale seemed ecstatic about her new musical discovery. Although we listened to it frequently that summer it was not something that would be found in the “Recently Played” portion of my iPod.
While visiting downtown Asheville, I came across an Orange Peel poster that listed Sleigh Bells as being the featured artist on Tuesday, 10/9. I had never been to a show at the Orange Peel (primarily because I am not especially familiar with many of the artists who play at the venue) and thought that attending Sleigh Bells would be an enjoyable, worthwhile experience. It also presented itself as a great opportunity to write a story for reverb.
Sleigh Bells, established themselves as a “noise-pop, indie pop/rock, dance funk” duo, in 2008 in Brooklyn NYC. The duo consists of Derek Edward Miller (guitar) and Alexis Krauss (vocals). Miller, a former guitarist for Poison the Well, moved to Brooklyn looking for a female vocalist to collaborate with on his song demos. While working at a Brazilian Bistro in Brooklyn he met Krauss, who at the time was teaching Spanish to children in the Bronx. Miller expressed his desire to find a female vocalist, while Krauss was dining with her mother at the restaurant. After being volunteered by her mother, she met with Miller and reviewed his demos in a park, through his headphones. Krauss had been pursuing a Rhodes scholarship at the time, yet chose to begin a creative relationship with Miller instead. Sleigh Bells signed to M.I.A’s N.E.E.T Recordings, and Mom+Pop records in 2009, and soon after recorded their first seven track self-titled EP. Their first album, Treats, was released in May 2010.
Sleigh Bells released Reign Of Terror in February 2012, which also serves as the title of their current tour. I am partial to their first album, which features tracks such as “Tell ‘Em,” “Rill Rill,” and “Crown on the Ground.”
I definitely underestimated the intensity of the show. Krauss’ vocals are very unique, and Sleigh Bells produces an awesome, mind-boggling noise. The duo did not come on stage until a little after 11, yet definitely made their presence at the Orange Peel known. A little before the show started I remember glancing at a sign that advertised ear plugs for 50 cents, and thinking to myself that I might want to invest. I really should have. The sign accompanied with a case of ringing ears haunted me for days.
Although the concert was not exactly soothing to the senses, I found Sleigh Bells to be a great way to be introduced to the Orange Peel. The concert was a great experience with Krauss dawning a sick leather jacket that was a stunning contrast to the fog, and colorful lighting and the music was in a word, unfathomable. View Larger

Unique Noise at the Orange Peel


By Claire Toal


I remember the first time I heard “Sleigh Bells”. Statistics, guacamole, Winston cigarettes, and a telemarketing job consumed that summer. Gale, my closest girlfriend at that time, took up residence in one of the extra bedrooms in my parent’s suburban home and spent her days searching for additional part time summer employment. On a hazy Thursday afternoon, she picked me up from my community college and bombarded me with the noise pop of “Sleigh Bells”. I could barely decipher the lyrics, but Gale seemed ecstatic about her new musical discovery. Although we listened to it frequently that summer it was not something that would be found in the “Recently Played” portion of my iPod.

While visiting downtown Asheville, I came across an Orange Peel poster that listed Sleigh Bells as being the featured artist on Tuesday, 10/9. I had never been to a show at the Orange Peel (primarily because I am not especially familiar with many of the artists who play at the venue) and thought that attending Sleigh Bells would be an enjoyable, worthwhile experience. It also presented itself as a great opportunity to write a story for reverb.

Sleigh Bells, established themselves as a “noise-pop, indie pop/rock, dance funk” duo, in 2008 in Brooklyn NYC. The duo consists of Derek Edward Miller (guitar) and Alexis Krauss (vocals). Miller, a former guitarist for Poison the Well, moved to Brooklyn looking for a female vocalist to collaborate with on his song demos. While working at a Brazilian Bistro in Brooklyn he met Krauss, who at the time was teaching Spanish to children in the Bronx. Miller expressed his desire to find a female vocalist, while Krauss was dining with her mother at the restaurant. After being volunteered by her mother, she met with Miller and reviewed his demos in a park, through his headphones. Krauss had been pursuing a Rhodes scholarship at the time, yet chose to begin a creative relationship with Miller instead. Sleigh Bells signed to M.I.A’s N.E.E.T Recordings, and Mom+Pop records in 2009, and soon after recorded their first seven track self-titled EP. Their first album, Treats, was released in May 2010.

Sleigh Bells released Reign Of Terror in February 2012, which also serves as the title of their current tour. I am partial to their first album, which features tracks such as “Tell ‘Em,” “Rill Rill,” and “Crown on the Ground.”

I definitely underestimated the intensity of the show. Krauss’ vocals are very unique, and Sleigh Bells produces an awesome, mind-boggling noise. The duo did not come on stage until a little after 11, yet definitely made their presence at the Orange Peel known. A little before the show started I remember glancing at a sign that advertised ear plugs for 50 cents, and thinking to myself that I might want to invest. I really should have. The sign accompanied with a case of ringing ears haunted me for days.

Although the concert was not exactly soothing to the senses, I found Sleigh Bells to be a great way to be introduced to the Orange Peel. The concert was a great experience with Krauss dawning a sick leather jacket that was a stunning contrast to the fog, and colorful lighting and the music was in a word, unfathomable.